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Vietnam Driving

Vietnam Driving

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Vietnam Driving

Driving

Driving in Vietnam is chaotic and not for the faint of heart. Most expats choose to hire a car and driver, which is easy enough, however some choose to get their driving license and brave the roads of Vietnam. We also have info on exchanging your driving license, buying a car and taking the public transport.

  • Passing your driving test & getting a license in Vietnam

    Expats who are aged 18 years of age and over may apply for a Vietnamese driving licence as long as they hold a valid passport and a resident card or visa with no less than three, or in some places, no less than six month’s validity.

  • Parking Fines

    A car is not the most popular mode of transport as most people in Vietnam prefer to ride a motorcycle as it’s easier to get around. Because of this, information about parking regulations are very few and far between.

  • Seeing Vietnam via the river

    There are some things that you can only experience on the rivers of Vietnam. One is the floating market which is literally a delta filled with boats and canoes of people selling their wares. The only way to access it is by boat. Some of the best places to visit by water taxi are the Chai Rang floating market, the Mekong Delta and the Cu Chi.

  • Buying & selling a car

    Buying a car privately is very similar to buying one from a dealership. Please see registering a car for information regarding the documents needed for the sale to proceed. In order to sell a car just follow the same instructions for the seller.

  • Driving In Vietnam

    Loads of expats choose not to drive as the roads are extremely chaotic to say the least. While many Asian countries’ roads are very well maintained with stringent traffic laws, Vietnam is not the same. In fact some expats report that driving in the country is downright hazardous and people should only do it if they absolutely have to.

  • Taking the bus

    Many people rely on the bus in Vietnam and due to the ongoing upgrades you will see many more modern busses equipped with air-con and comfortable seating than in the past. Vietnamese buses are quite the antitheses of buses in other parts of the world.

  • Taxi's

    There are many, many taxis in Vietnam, most of them will grossly overcharge customers, which is why it is important to find the right taxi company. We have a bit about two of the reputable taxi companies that cater to the residents of Vietnam, just be aware of copy cats!!

  • Taking the train

    Travelling through Vietnam is sometimes faster by train than it is by plane when you factor in transfers, delays and queues. There are hundreds of train stations around the country linking cities and towns together. There is even the option of luxury overnight travel aboard the orient express.

  • Registering your car

    The entire process of registering your new car can take between two and four weeks so you have to be patient during the process. If you buy your car from a dealer and complete all the necessary documentation, the dealership should handle all the registration requirements. However if you purchase a car from a private sale, you will have to register the car yourself.

  • Public Transport

    There are many modes of public transport that you can choose. From a ride on a rickshaw to an overnight train journey there is loads to choose from. We briefly explore the modes of public transport available to the expats that are brave enough to try them.

  • Exchanging a Foreign License

    It is possible to exchange a foreign driving license for a Vietnamese one. This is the easiest way to obtain a driving permit in Vietnam, and event the seemingly simple process can get tied up in a wave of bureaucracy. We have all the info that you need to make the process as painless as possible!

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